About Us 2017-12-08T13:55:03+00:00

Our History

Pepsi-Cola Bottling Co. of Luverne, AL

The bottling company in Luverne began in 1915 by John Turner as a three-man operation on the ground floor of the old St. Charles Hotel, producing 200 cases per day of Lime-Cola, Mil-Kay and NuGrape. Two plant men fed the bottle washer and filler by hand and bottles were crowned by a foot-powered machine. Syrups were mixed in barrels and stirred by wooden paddles. There was one salesman who delivered 40 cases per day by horse and wagon to the company’s territory, which at the time, was limited to Crenshaw County.

Upon John Turner’s death in 1918, his two brothers and son took over operations for the next twenty-one years, expanding the operation to a new

In 2010, 2011 and 2013, Pepsi Luverne was honored by being selected as a finalist for PepsiCo’s Donald M. Kendall Bottler of the Year Award. The award represents the highest honor bestowed among independent Pepsi-Cola bottlers in North America.

facility. In 1939, the three men divided their business interest and George Turner, Sr. retained the bottling business, joined by his son George Turner, Jr. and brother-in law, W. O. Hornsby.  George Turner, Sr. secured the Pepsi-Cola franchise and extended the bottling company’s territory to five complete counties and portions of four others. In 1942, machines were installed increasing capacity to 800 cases per day, and personnel expanded to 6 plant operators and 4 salesmen. During WWII, the company experienced hardships comparable to those of other businesses. Tires and trucks were rationed and sugar had to be secured from Cuba and Mexico for bottlers operating in the south.

In 1946, George Turner, Jr. returned from the war and rejoined his father in the bottling business. The Turners purchased the Hornsby interest in the business and soon began pursuing plans to completely update the operation. By 1952, the Turners had installed new machinery and equipment that increased capacity to 2,500 cases per day.

In 1960, George Turner, Sr. died, and his son continued to run the company. In 1965, a new 20,000 sq. ft. facility was erected, lines updated to a 3,500 case per day capacity and the company expanded to include 35 employees. In 1968, the company acquired the Dr Pepper Bottling Company of Opp, increasing sales by 45 percent.

In 1972, George Turner, Jr. was tragically killed in a house fire, along with his wife, Dee, and his granddaughter, Stephanie Springford. His son-in-law, Brent Springford, moved with his wife, Charlotte, from New York to Alabama to assume management of the company. In 1972, the company acquired the Seven-Up Bottling Company of Andalusia, and by 1976, the production capacity of the operation was up to 8,000 cases per day, employing approximately 100 people.

In 1981, the company, along with twelve other bottlers formed Southeast Canners, Inc. a canning co-op in Columbus, GA. By 1986, the co-op was running bottles; therefore, the bottling lines in Luverne were shut down and dismantled.

Following the deaths of Brent and Charlotte Springford in 2004, their son-in-law, Greg Crouch, joined the family business and remains the current President/CEO of Pepsi Luverne. Today, following several renovations, the company’s headquarters and facilities occupy 70,000 sq ft in 3 buildings on 12 acres. The company has also expanded its inventory to include bottled waters, specialty juices, isotonics, new age beverages, coffee, tea and snacks.

In 2010, 2011 and 2013, Pepsi Luverne was honored by being selected as a finalist for PepsiCo’s Donald M. Kendall Bottler of the Year Award. The award represents the highest honor bestowed among independent Pepsi-Cola bottlers in North America. Finalist are selected based on a rigorous criteria, including volume and share growth, per capita consumption, product quality, customer service and community involvement. Pepsi Luverne was named the 2013 Donald M. Kendall Bottler of the Year. In 2014, Pepsi Luverne was also recognized by Beverage Industry Magazine by being selected as its ‘2014 Bottler of the Year’.

The bottling company in Luverne began in 1915 by John Turner as a three-man operation on the ground floor of the old St. Charles Hotel, producing 200 cases per day of Lime-Cola, Mil-Kay and NuGrape. Two plant men fed the bottle washer and filler by hand and bottles were crowned by a foot-powered machine. Syrups were mixed in barrels and stirred by wooden paddles. There was one salesman who delivered 40 cases per day by horse and wagon to the company’s territory, which at the time, was limited to Crenshaw County.

Upon John Turner’s death in 1918, his two brothers and son took over operations for the next twenty-one years, expanding the operation to a new

In 2010, 2011 and 2013, Pepsi Luverne was honored by being selected as a finalist for PepsiCo’s Donald M. Kendall Bottler of the Year Award. The award represents the highest honor bestowed among independent Pepsi-Cola bottlers in North America.

facility. In 1939, the three men divided their business interest and George Turner, Sr. retained the bottling business, joined by his son George Turner, Jr. and brother-in law, W. O. Hornsby.  George Turner, Sr. secured the Pepsi-Cola franchise and extended the bottling company’s territory to five complete counties and portions of four others. In 1942, machines were installed increasing capacity to 800 cases per day, and personnel expanded to 6 plant operators and 4 salesmen. During WWII, the company experienced hardships comparable to those of other businesses. Tires and trucks were rationed and sugar had to be secured from Cuba and Mexico for bottlers operating in the south.

In 1946, George Turner, Jr. returned from the war and rejoined his father in the bottling business. The Turners purchased the Hornsby interest in the business and soon began pursuing plans to completely update the operation. By 1952, the Turners had installed new machinery and equipment that increased capacity to 2,500 cases per day.

In 1960, George Turner, Sr. died, and his son continued to run the company. In 1965, a new 20,000 sq. ft. facility was erected, lines updated to a 3,500 case per day capacity and the company expanded to include 35 employees. In 1968, the company acquired the Dr Pepper Bottling Company of Opp, increasing sales by 45 percent.

In 1972, George Turner, Jr. was tragically killed in a house fire, along with his wife, Dee, and his granddaughter, Stephanie Springford. His son-in-law, Brent Springford, moved with his wife, Charlotte, from New York to Alabama to assume management of the company. In 1972, the company acquired the Seven-Up Bottling Company of Andalusia, and by 1976, the production capacity of the operation was up to 8,000 cases per day, employing approximately 100 people.

In 1981, the company, along with twelve other bottlers formed Southeast Canners, Inc. a canning co-op in Columbus, GA. By 1986, the co-op was running bottles; therefore, the bottling lines in Luverne were shut down and dismantled.

Following the deaths of Brent and Charlotte Springford in 2004, their son-in-law, Greg Crouch, joined the family business and remains the current President/CEO of Pepsi Luverne. Today, following several renovations, the company’s headquarters and facilities occupy 70,000 sq ft in 3 buildings on 12 acres. The company has also expanded its inventory to include bottled waters, specialty juices, isotonics, new age beverages, coffee, tea and snacks.

In 2010, 2011 and 2013, Pepsi Luverne was honored by being selected as a finalist for PepsiCo’s Donald M. Kendall Bottler of the Year Award. The award represents the highest honor bestowed among independent Pepsi-Cola bottlers in North America. Finalist are selected based on a rigorous criteria, including volume and share growth, per capita consumption, product quality, customer service and community involvement. Pepsi Luverne was named the 2013 Donald M. Kendall Bottler of the Year. In 2014, Pepsi Luverne was also recognized by Beverage Industry Magazine by being selected as its ‘2014 Bottler of the Year’.